Lyrics to coal miners daughter

Loretta Lynn Had To Remove Verses from “Coal Miner’s Daughter”

lyrics to coal miners daughter

Lyrics to "Coal Miner's Daughter" song by Loretta Lynn: Well, I was born a coal miner's daughter In a cabin, on a hill in Butcher Holler We were poor but we.

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Videos were added by Siorak , ison. Songs lyrics and translations to be found here are protected by copyright of their owners and are meant for educative purposes only. Report illegal content. Playlist Share. Well, I was born'd a coal miner's daughter, In a cabin, on a hill in Butcher Holler, We were poor, but we had love, That's the one thing that daddy made sure of, He shoveled coal t' make a poor man's dollar. My daddy worked all night in the Van Lear Coal Mines, All day long in the field a-hoein' corn, Mommy rocked the babies at night, And read The Bible by the coal-oil light, Everything would start all over come break of morn'. Daddy loved and raised eight kids on a miner's pay, Mommy scrubbed our clothes on a washboard every day, Why, I seen her fingers bleed, to complain, there was no need, She'd smile in mommy's understanding way.

Loretta Lynn- Country Series. Well, I was born a coal miner's daughter In a cabin on a hill in Butcher Holler We were poor, but we had love That's the one thing that Daddy made sure of He shoveled coal to make a poor man's dollar. My Daddy worked all night in the Vanleer coal mines All day long in the field a-hoin' corn Mommy rocked the babies at night And read the Bible by the coal-oil light And ever'thing would start all over come break of morn'. Daddy loved and raised eight kids on a miner's pay Mommy scrubbed our clothes on a washboard ever' day Why, I've seen her fingers bleed To complain there was no need She'd smile in Mommy's understanding way. In the summertime we didn't have shoes to wear But in the wintertime we'd all get a brand new pair From a mail order catalog Money made from sellin' a hog Daddy always managed to get the money somewhere. Yeah, I'm proud to be a coal miner's daughter I remember well - the well where I drew water The work we done was hard At night we'd sleep 'cause we worked hard I never thought of ever leaving Butcher Holler. Well, a lot of things have changed since way back then And it's so good to be back home again Not much left but the floor Nothing lives here anymore Except the mem'ries of a coal miner's daughter.

Released in , the song became Lynn's signature song , one of the genre's most widely known songs, and provided the basis for both her autobiography and a movie on her life. The song additionally discusses how she and her seven siblings lived off of a coal miner's salary " Daddy loved and raised eight kids on a miner's pay " , and that her father always made sure there was love in the Webb household. Subsequent verses recall Lynn's other childhood experiences and hardships, such as her mother reading the Bible by a coal-oil light or having bloody fingers from constantly doing the laundry using an abrasive "warsh" board this pronunciation was reflective of her Appalachian Kentucky roots , [1] ordering shoes from a mail-order catalog, and working so hard every day that everyone slept because "they were tired. In the song's final verse, the now-adult Lynn returns to her homestead, which has since been abandoned " Not much left but the floor; nothing lives here anymore However, she remarks that the "memories of a coal miner's daughter" remain.

Well, I was born a coal miner's daughter In a cabin on a hill in Butcher Holler We were poor, but we had love That's the one thing that Daddy made sure of He shoveled coal to make a poor man's dollar. My Daddy worked all night in the Vanleer coal mines All day long in the field a-hoin' corn Mommy rocked the babies at night And read the Bible by the coal-oil light And ever'thing would start all over come break of morn'. Daddy loved and raised eight kids on a miner's pay Mommy scrubbed our clothes on a washboard ever' day Why, I've seen her fingers bleed To complain there was no need She'd smile in Mommy's understanding way. In the summertime we didn't have shoes to wear But in the wintertime we'd all get a brand new pair From a mail order catalog Money made from sellin' a hog Daddy always managed to get the money somewhere. Yeah, I'm proud to be a coal miner's daughter I remember well - the well where I drew water The work we done was hard At night we'd sleep 'cause we worked hard I never thought of ever leaving Butcher Holler. Well, a lot of things have changed since way back then And it's so good to be back home again Not much left but the floor Nothing lives here anymore Except the mem'ries of a coal miner's daughter. Please click here if you are not redirected within a few seconds.



Coal Miners Daughter Lyrics

Coal Miner's Daughter - Loretta Lynn

Coal Miner's Daughter (song)

Well, I was borned a coal miner's daughter, In a cabin, on a hill in Butcher Holler. We were poor but we had love, That's the one thing that Daddy made sure of, He shoveled coal to make a poor man's dollar. My Daddy worked all night in the Van Lear coal mines. All day long in the field a hoin' corn. Mommy rocked the babies at night, And read the Bible by the coal oil light, And ever' thing would start all over come break of morn.

Coal Miners Daughter

Lynn's lyrics showed the world that she was not ashamed to be what others would call a "hillbilly. Lynn grew up poor in the Appalachian hills of Eastern Kentucky. During her childhood in the s and s, the "hillbilly" was the stereotype for all poor white people from the hills. They were often represented as ignorant, naive, and lacking civilization. The hillbilly image was popular stuff for jokes and B-movies, ranging from the comic strip L'il Abner to horror flicks featuring killer cannibal hillbillies. Lynn says that when her song and biography were turned into a movie in , she'd "handpicked Sissy Spacek to play [her] in the movie. It was hard to watch my life flashing before my eyes [

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