Soldiers of the first world war library and archives canada

Common menu bar links

soldiers of the first world war library and archives canada

The French Experience – Canada’s Contribution to the First World War

and   you

Between and , a young Canada faced the trials and devastation of war alongside our allied countries. Thousands of Canadians answered the call to contribute to the war effort required for the First World War. Here is a selection of photographs taken during an era that transformed our identity as a country. Recruits from Saskatchewan's File Hills community pose with elders, family members, and representative from the Department of Indian Affairs before departing for Great Britain. Historical Photo Gallery End of an Era.

A Canadian sergeant responded by opening fire, hitting two of the merrymakers. It was a preview of coming developments. Canadian soldiers would emerge from the First World War with a reputation for winning victories that others could not. But even in a war of unparalleled ferocity, enemy and ally alike would remember the Canadians as having been particularly brutal. British war correspondent Philip Gibbs had a front row seat on four years of Western Front fighting. He would single out the Canadians as having been particularly obsessed with killing Germans, calling their war a kind of vendetta. The English poet Robert Graves was less charitable.

This archived Web page remains online for reference, research or recordkeeping purposes. This page will not be altered or updated. Web pages that are archived on the Internet are not subject to the Government of Canada Web Standards. As per the Communications Policy of the Government of Canada, you can request alternate formats of this page on the Contact Us page. Wounded Canadian soldiers make their way over muddy terrain to an aid post during the Battle of Passchendaele, November We were lying practically on the bed of the river which had been shelled all to pieces and it was just a marshy bog… our company headquarters got blown to pieces… before we started off… and the battle hadn't even begun. Alex Strachan, 43rd Battalion, War diary of 43rd Battalion.



Personnel Records of the First World War

For more information on this exciting project please visit our updated website here. - New Names in Canadian History. Recruitment campaign Item number

First World War

This database combines references to various First World War personnel records. Digitization of the Canadian Expeditionary Force personnel files is complete. The database also includes digitized files for many individuals who served in the Royal Newfoundland Regiment and Newfoundland Forestry Corps courtesy of the Rooms Provincial Archives. The files of Canadian Expeditionary Force members CEF , which include those of soldiers, nurses and chaplains, consist of documents dealing with enlistment, training, medical and dental history, hospitalization, discipline, pay, medal entitlements and discharge or notification of death. The files contain an average of 25 to 75 pages, with the smaller files typically being those of personnel who were drafted or who enlisted later in the war. See our Search tips which include CEF helpful facts. The First World War, fought between and , was the first of the great world-wide conflicts of the twentieth century, pitting the 'Central Powers' of Germany, Austria-Hungary, Turkey and smaller allies against the 'Entente', notably the British Empire, France Russia, Italy, Japan, the United States, and their allies.

This archived Web page remains online for reference, research or recordkeeping purposes. This page will not be altered or updated. Web pages that are archived on the Internet are not subject to the Government of Canada Web Standards. As per the Communications Policy of the Government of Canada, you can request alternate formats of this page on the Contact Us page. He immediately joined the ranks of the only Francophone infantry unit, the 22nd Battalion, where he experienced the exhausting routine of trench life and the indescribable horror of combat.

Their Soldiers of the First World War database has attestation papers of most of the , soldiers, chaplains and nursing sisters who served with the Canadian Expeditionary Force. By , that database will be expanded to include the complete service files of each member which will be a boon to amateur genealogists tracing their family history.

The forgotten ruthlessness of Canada’s Great War soldiers

Please note if the official name of the museum begins with the word, 'the', the listing will be filed under the letter 't'. There is no online database for these records held by Library and Archives Canada. Canadian Virtual War Memorial Excellent site that provides information about the more than , Canadians and Newfoundlanders who fought and died while representing their country since Confederation. The site also contains digital images of photographs and personal memorabilia about individual Canadians. The casualty database lists the names and place of commemoration of 1. It also records details of the 67, Commonwealth civilians who died "as a result of enemy action" in the Second World War. Use the left-hand menu to select the period or type of records of interest to you.

.

2 thoughts on “Soldiers of the first world war library and archives canada

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *